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The Chair of the Association for Education and Ageing was live tweeting from an EU conference about lifelong learning and ageing. This topic is of interest to me as my PhD is about learning across the lifecourse. The AEA chair, Jonathan Hughes ( @JonEmHughes ) was tweeting away, summarising interesting points about ageing and education from a European perspective.

However, it sees that Jonathan doesn’t have a massive following, the conference did not have a hashtag and the project does not have a Twitter handle. Therefore, unfortunately, his Tweets are likely to never be read, Jonathan may not get new followers and people may not get to hear about the Association he chairs.

So I decided to create a Storify of Jonathan’s Tweets because he was providing very good commentary and it would be a shame if no one were to ever read them. I can’t embed the Storify as I think you need a plugin and I am just learning, so here is the link instead:

ForAge annual conference. ‘Forage for later-life learning: Building on European experience’.

To curate the storify of the learning and ageing conference today very easy as only one person who I could find was Tweeting about it. There may have been many others but it would be impossible for me or anyone to find. That’s why it would have been helpful if there was a conference hashtag. Conference organisers, make sure you have a hashtag!

Although there are many ways to disseminate research and I am sure that papers from this conference will be published widely as the conference seems to have come out of a large EU bid, I think Twitter is a way for people to get to know about your project and activities at the time they are happening rather than just afterwards. It is also a way for people who are not directly involved in your project to hear about it and ask questions about it.

One day Twitter will probably be replaced by something else but for the moment, I feel like it is has become a standard and even expected way to promote and share information about your conference before it happens, during and after, through archive/curation tools like Storify.

In 1996 I was a school girl studying for my GCSEs. My older sister who was two years older had left school with below a C grade in Maths. She had to retake at sixth-form college but ended up with a lower grade than her first attempt and on her final retake scored ‘Ungraded’. The reason for this decline in motivation and increased boredom I witnessed with each retake was a bit of a worry for me as I didn’t want to go through this.

So I set myself up a little revision room in the watertank cupboard at home (it was the only ‘spare room’ we had). I had a desk, a chair, a radio/cassette player and made a detailed colour coded GCSE revision timetable. As you tend to do about 10 GCSE exams at the same time I had to prioritise time spent on subjects. So maths got top priority, marked in yellow. I worked hard revising for a couple of months and despite the watertank being hot and noisy, especially at bath times, my revision schedule worked a treat and I got a C!

Now that I have elected to do Advanced Quantitative Methods as part of my PhD I have to revisit some GCSE maths as I feel that I have lept right into a whole advanced world before I have mastered the basics. This became very obvious to me last week when in our statistics class, the lecturer said ‘now here is a quick recap on logit which you would have done at school’. There is NO WAY I did this at school.   This logit business is just for the people in the advanced sets who used scientific calculators and not something we lower sets would have been burdened with. But the fact that the lecturer assumed that we had all done this before made me realise that it must be quite unusual for someone from the lower sets to even think about trying out Advanced Quantitative Methods in their future lives.

However, I am a firm believer that your GCSE grades don’t really reflect much – they reflect how good your teacher was, whether or not an annoying boy pulled at your hair all lesson, as well as how much you revised in the watertank cupboard in the summer of 1996, but they don’t reflect current and future potential to learn.

So in the spirit of my PhD topic which is about lifelong learning, I would say do not let your past experiences of school maths stop you from learning now – start off by using the marvellous online tutorials which of course did not exist back in 1996, such as the Khan Academy (especially the algebra stuff which is essential for regression statistics). And if you quite liked the old maths book you used in the past, you might be lucky to find it in the IOE library which has a collection of ‘retro’ GCSE textbooks. I found my old watertank cupboard friends:

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Retro maths books: Let’s convert those francs to pounds!

(c) 2014 Annika Coughlin

Today, Professor Stuart Hall died at the age of 82. Many obituaries have been written but I wanted to write about what he meant to me.

I am not an expert on his work by any means. My awareness of Stuart Hall is mainly through my father who used the course materials prepared by him when he was doing a foundation course in Social Sciences with the Open University in the 1980s – when I was a child.

This was a time when there was mass unemployment, strikes and riots. Margaret Thatcher was in power and in my household she was a massive hate figure. We grew up on benefits but this doesn’t mean you are a lazy scrounger like the modern media likes to suggest, rather, my father decided to get educated. In those days I think people on benefits could get their fees for the OU paid by the government, so he did a few modules in Social Science. Stuart Hall was the course leader of the D102 unit, Conformity, Consensus and Conflict, and wrote the unit handbook. He wrote in a very accessible, respectful and friendly way. In this unit he explained the concept of ideology and why the working classes voted for Thatcher. There is a lot in there about striking and industrial relations and a critique of the concept of ‘false class consciousness’. Of course I couldn’t really read them then – being a child and all (although they are also illustrated with photos and drawings), but my dad who used to go off on one about Thatcher quite regularly, was now able to underpin his rants with sociological theory and deeper understandings of ideology, power and British society in the 1980s.

These course books were so excellent that we didn’t throw them away. Rather I even referred to them when I was doing my Sociology degree and MA years later. When my dad died in 2005 and we had a big tidy up, we eventually did get rid of the course books, but I kept this one as well as the core text that goes with it.

D102 coursebooks

D102 coursebooks

The passing of Stuart Hall is sad in itself, but for me, it is tangled up with the sadness of my father’s death. I see our handwritten notes side by side in the OU text and I feel a connection between the three of us through these course books. I am now doing a PhD in sociology about lifelong learning and higher education. This OU text really symbolises to me the importance of education for working class and unemployed people and their children.

I thank Stuart Hall for helping us to understand more about the society in which we live through his magnificent gift of writing, speaking and teaching.

 

hall

(c) 2014 Annika Coughlin

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